Scoop! Hold the front page!

Editorial note: If you have not yet read our mission statement above, please do so in order that you can put our blogs in context. 

7 April 2014

SHOCK HORROR DOWN UNDER! ROYAL PARENTS “CARRY” BABY SON OFF PLANE!

Millions of viewers and listeners throughout the world allegedly tune in to the daily bulletins of the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) in the belief that they will get a well-researched and unbiased up-to-the-minute account of the most significant items of hot news that day.

Certainly there is no shortage of newsworthy events happening at the moment – the continuing turmoil in Ukraine, the collapse of the Palestinian-Israeli peace talks, the elections in India and Afghanistan, the 20the anniversary of the genocide in Rwanda, mounting repression by the US-backed military dictatorship in Egypt, and so on.

So it’s good to find that the BBC has its finger on the pulse of the world’s latest mega-story.

This morning the corporation’s world news home page had the following headline item emblazoned across it:

Duke and Duchess of Cambridge carry Prince George off plane at start of three-week tour of New Zealand and Australia.”

What were they expecting? That his parents would toss the eight-month-old future King down on to the tarmac?

Good to know that BBC standards are as reliable as ever when it comes to concocting schmaltzy tosh about the regular taxpayer-financed freebies enjoyed by unelected members of the Windsor family.

As we often say in these columns, you could not make it up.

We do feel sorry, however, for those millions of poor suckers around the world who are taken in by the charade that passes for BBC impartiality, independence and news sense.

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 You might perhaps care to view some of our earlier posts.  For instance:

1. Why? or How? That is the question (3 Jan 2012)

2. Partitocracy v. Democracy (20 July 2012)

3. The shoddiest possible goods at the highest possible prices (2 Feb 2012)

4. Capitalism in practice  (4 July 2012) 

  1. Ladder  (21 June 2012)

 6. A tale of two cities (1)  (6 June 2012)

 7. A tale of two cities (2)  (7 June 2012)

 8. Where’s the beef? Ontology and tinned meat (31 Jan 2012)

Every so often we shall change this sample of previously published posts.

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Posted in Afghanistan, Australia, Egypt, India, Israel, New Zealand, Palestine, Politics, UK, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Hay Wrap

Antigone1984:

This nugget is performed by Irish rock band “The Saw Doctors”, which was formed in Tuam, County Galway, in 1986.

 

Posted in Ireland, Music | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Don’t fix it if it’s not broken!

Editorial note: If you have not yet read our mission statement above, please do so in order that you can put our blogs in context. 

22 January 2014

Children from two to ten years old should “feel the texture of a  book and the printed word in reading and writing and the physical holding of of it”.

This was the reply of Irish Education Minister Ruairí Quinn in the Dáil (Parliament, Lower House) this week to Clare Daly (Teachta Dála – Member of Parliament)) who had asked about the move away from written books towards iPads and e-books.

Antigone1984:

Let’s hear it for Mr Quinn!

Antigone1984 is increasingly opposed to so called progress that involves the unending purchase of expensive electronic  gadgets to perform a function – reading – that was perfectly feasible at one hundredth of the price before the electronic marketing industry set out to persuade consumers that they would be social zilch unless they outlaid their hard-won earnings on cyber plastic.

Go have a shufti at the illuminated manuscript of the Latin Gospels in the Book of Kells – handwritten around 800 BC – in the numinous Old Library at Dublin’s Trinity College (built 1712-1732).

Then say that you’d prefer pixels!

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 You might perhaps care to view some of our earlier posts.  For instance:

1. Why? or How? That is the question (3 Jan 2012)

2. Partitocracy v. Democracy (20 July 2012)

3. The shoddiest possible goods at the highest possible prices (2 Feb 2012)

4. Capitalism in practice  (4 July 2012) 

5.Ladder  (21 June 2012)

 6. A tale of two cities (1)  (6 June 2012)

 7. A tale of two cities (2)  (7 June 2012)

 8. Where’s the beef? Ontology and tinned meat (31 Jan 2012)

Every so often we shall change this sample of previously published posts.

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Posted in Education, Ireland, Literature, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Bowling googlies

Editorial note: If you have not yet read our mission statement above, please do so in order that you can put our blogs in context. 

21 January 2014

Never trust the buggers, whatever they say!

Hardly a day passes without further evidence – as if we needed it – that statements by public figures, particularly politicians, should be simply ignored unless there is rock-solid third-party confirmation of the truth of the assertion being made.

Britain was recently subject to widespread flooding.

According to yesterday’s London Guardian newspaper, environment secretary Owen Paterson falsely claimed that government spending on flood protection had increased, “as his junior minister Dan Rogerson has now admitted”.

However, according to the newspaper, instead of frankly acknowledging that the environment department had got it wrong, Rogerson merely said that the figures were “subject to minor discrepancies”.

Nice one, Cyril!

The paper goes on to list a number of other well-known euphemisms.

Winston Churchill, UK prime minister during and after the Second World War, is said to have once accused an opponent of “terminological inexactitude”. What he meant was that his adversary was lying.

Another famous euphemism is attributed to former Japanese emperor Hirohito. When Japan, defeated, surrendered to the Yanks at the end of the Second World War, Hirohito informed the population that the war “had developed in a way not necessarily to Japan’s advantage”.

Of course, the resort to euphemistic obfuscation is not confined to politicians.

In a case involving testimony given by US actress Jayne Mansfield, a policeman asked whether she had been lying. No, Mansfield replied, she had not been lying. She had simply “redimensioned the truth a little”.

Playing with a straight bat is not a feature of public life.

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 You might perhaps care to view some of our earlier posts.  For instance:

1. Why? or How? That is the question (3 Jan 2012)

2. Partitocracy v. Democracy (20 July 2012)

3. The shoddiest possible goods at the highest possible prices (2 Feb 2012)

4. Capitalism in practice  (4 July 2012) 

5.Ladder  (21 June 2012)

 6. A tale of two cities (1)  (6 June 2012)

 7. A tale of two cities (2)  (7 June 2012)

 8. Where’s the beef? Ontology and tinned meat (31 Jan 2012)

Every so often we shall change this sample of previously published posts.

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Posted in Japan, UK, USA | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Crystal balls-up

Editorial note: If you have not yet read our mission statement above, please do so in order that you can put our blogs in context. 

20 January 2014

One great advantage of the present time, which is the outcome of many past disadvantages and much tribulation, is that men have had their fill of fighting.”

The Spectator magazine, London, 1913.

Antigone1984:

They’d best stay out of Paddy Power!

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 You might perhaps care to view some of our earlier posts.  For instance:

1. Why? or How? That is the question (3 Jan 2012)

2. Partitocracy v. Democracy (20 July 2012)

3. The shoddiest possible goods at the highest possible prices (2 Feb 2012)

4. Capitalism in practice  (4 July 2012) 

5.Ladder  (21 June 2012)

 6. A tale of two cities (1)  (6 June 2012)

 7. A tale of two cities (2)  (7 June 2012)

 8. Where’s the beef? Ontology and tinned meat (31 Jan 2012)

Every so often we shall change this sample of previously published posts.

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Posted in Europe, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Russia, UK, UN, USA | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Dancing in the rain

Editorial note: If you have not yet read our mission statement above, please do so in order that you can put our blogs in context. 

13 January 2014

Life is not about waiting for the storm to pass but learning how to dance in the rain.

Advice in a letter – author’s name not available – to Simon Hoggart (1946-2014), the popular London Guardian columnist who died on 5 January.

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 You might perhaps care to view some of our earlier posts.  For instance:

1. Why? or How? That is the question (3 Jan 2012)

2. Partitocracy v. Democracy (20 July 2012)

3. The shoddiest possible goods at the highest possible prices (2 Feb 2012)

4. Capitalism in practice  (4 July 2012) 

5.Ladder  (21 June 2012)

 6. A tale of two cities (1)  (6 June 2012)

 7. A tale of two cities (2)  (7 June 2012)

 8. Where’s the beef? Ontology and tinned meat (31 Jan 2012)

Every so often we shall change this sample of previously published posts.

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Posted in Guardian, Music, UK | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Liberty: bottom-up not top-down

Editorial note: If you have not yet read our mission statement above, please do so in order that you can put our blogs in context. 

12 January 2014

Liberty has never come from the government. Liberty has always come from the subjects of government. The history of liberty is the history of resistance. The history of liberty is a history of the limitation of governmental power, not the increase of it.

Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), US President 1913-1921, speaking to the New York Press Club on 9 September 1912.

Antigone1984:

Perhaps it is worth pointing out that these sentiments were expressed before Wilson took office as President of the United States.

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 You might perhaps care to view some of our earlier posts.  For instance:

1. Why? or How? That is the question (3 Jan 2012)

2. Partitocracy v. Democracy (20 July 2012)

3. The shoddiest possible goods at the highest possible prices (2 Feb 2012)

4. Capitalism in practice  (4 July 2012) 

5.Ladder  (21 June 2012)

 6. A tale of two cities (1)  (6 June 2012)

 7. A tale of two cities (2)  (7 June 2012)

 8. Where’s the beef? Ontology and tinned meat (31 Jan 2012)

Every so often we shall change this sample of previously published posts.

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Posted in Uncategorized, USA | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment